About Blog Title...

As a child, it was one of my greatest delights to visit my grandparents in the spring when the whip-poor-wills began to call. Grandma and Grandpa lived in a remote valley of the Ozark Mountains where there were trees a plenty, and, seemingly, a whip-poor-will, or two, in each one.
My grandmother insisted that a whip-poor-will's call was not "whip-poor-will," but instead, "chip-butter-white-oak." I would listen really hard trying to hear it exactly as she said it was, but all I could hear was "whip-poor-will, whip-poor-will,..." But, I never let on to her.
I remember my grandpa watching and listening, with an amused look on his face, to one of these listening sessions. Shortly after that he began to call me, just for fun, "Chip Butter." It is a name I am proud to wear for I still love to hear that long, lonesome call on a warm summer's eve. And, sometimes, when I listen really, really hard, it seems I can hear quite clearly, "chip-butter-white-oak, chip-butter-white-oak..."


Saturday, April 21, 2012

The Old Way and the New...


Dan is mowing hay today...the start of a busy season on the farm, for sure.  It really doesn't look like hard work to me.  What could be easier than driving around in an air-conditioned tractor, sitting in a cushioned air-ride seat and listening to the radio? 





Not so long ago, mowing hay was not so easy.  The old fellow who farmed these same fields before us, mowed hay on an International Harvester  No. 9 mower, pulled by a team of horses.  The hitch was later adapted to be pulled by a tractor.  This old machine now sets in one of the flower borders here, where it is admired and discussed almost daily.  As for me, I just like the looks of it surrounded by small boulders, grasses and flowers.








4 comments:

  1. This is interesting! My hay cutter has come in, fallen into the recliner, and taking a nap. It must be hard work.

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  2. Sherri FarleyApr 25, 2012 06:48 PM

    Mary, I left this reply to your comment on my blog, but I want to make sure you see it just in case!!
    Mary, Thank you for the compliment on the dolls. I have been busy, and yes I do sew everything by hand....goofy me. Below are a few links (you'll have to copy & paste the links, or search by name) that I have purchased fabric from. There is also a quilt shop in Springfield I go to that carries some repro fabrics but I mostly buy on line. I find repro fabric is rather expensive but it is all I use for dresses. I also mostly buy in 1/2 yard increments so I don't repeat, and can get more variety. I am just careful to look for small prints and purchase several prints at one time as shipping is rather expensive.
    http://www.charlottescottagequiltshop.com/scripts/quiltshop.asp?category=Fabric

    http://www.reproductionfabrics.com/

    http://www.twobeesfabric.com/shop/1800s-Civil-War-Reproduction-Fabrics--Shirtings.htm

    http://www.nauvooquiltco.com/servlet/the-1800s-Reproduction-Fabric/Categories

    Hope that's helpful. Are you working on a doll now? I am looking for a photo or postcard for the MAIDA challenge.

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  3. Oh yes, I agree about the air conditioned tractor. When I moved to my old farmhouse 35 years ago all the surrounding farmers used older equipment and did their own work. Now, they sit in their air conditioned tractors and use help. They use to be in the tabbaco fields with family working and now help does it all. Times have changed. Years ago had old equipment hauled off and now I wish I had some of it in my garden :) I have even changed....

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