About Blog Title...

As a child, it was one of my greatest delights to visit my grandparents in the spring when the whip-poor-wills began to call. Grandma and Grandpa lived in a remote valley of the Ozark Mountains where there were trees a plenty, and, seemingly, a whip-poor-will, or two, in each one.
My grandmother insisted that a whip-poor-will's call was not "whip-poor-will," but instead, "chip-butter-white-oak." I would listen really hard trying to hear it exactly as she said it was, but all I could hear was "whip-poor-will, whip-poor-will,..." But, I never let on to her.
I remember my grandpa watching and listening, with an amused look on his face, to one of these listening sessions. Shortly after that he began to call me, just for fun, "Chip Butter." It is a name I am proud to wear for I still love to hear that long, lonesome call on a warm summer's eve. And, sometimes, when I listen really, really hard, it seems I can hear quite clearly, "chip-butter-white-oak, chip-butter-white-oak..."


Friday, November 22, 2013

Valley, a Cowgirl Doll...


"The first cowgirls broke the rules.  In the nineteenth century, a woman's place was in the home, not out on the range herding cattle, branding calves, or breaking horses:  Victorian society considered this behavior unladylike.  Complete with corset, a lady behaved decorously, served tea in the parlor, sewed, and cared for her husband and family.  Living on the fringes of society to run a cattle ranch was a preposterous vocation for a woman and represented uncharted territory.  Aware of the risks, but determined to succeed, one of Wyoming's first cowgirls was hanged for trying."

                                                            ~Cowgirls, Women of the Wild West by Elizabeth Clair Flood

Valley all dressed up in her Sunday best


A cowgirls can wear a bow in her hair. 

Valley takes pride in her wide brimmed "Stetson."

No side saddle for this little gal, thanks to her new split skirt.

 

Every cowgirl needs her own rope.


14 comments:

  1. She's fantastic!! She has a more "mature" look than your previous dolls, which I like very much! I think your mother would be proud of your abilities to make such beautiful clothes.

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    1. When I sew, Mom seems to be with me at every move. I am always having to look at something she made to see how to sew something. We miss our mothers don't we!

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  2. She really is fantastic! Love the striped stockings which are a clever touch and not what I was expecting. Great work.

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    1. Maddy, I had been hoping to hear from you. I have been thinking about Santa dolls and wondering if there would be a new one or two showing up at Santa and the Mrs. Do you think striped stockings are wrong for a cowgirl doll?

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  3. This cowgirl is super nice. Her clothes are so pretty and I do love her vest and the split skirt. It will be nice to still visit you here.

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    1. Martha, when I decided to make this move, my greatest fear was losing some of the friends I have made. I am so glad you are here.

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  4. Mary, I just love your dolls! They are not only meticulously made and beautiful, but so extraordinarily unique! You follow the beat of your own drum, just like these early cowgirls!

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    1. Rebecca, I keep meaning to get back to other dolls, but I kind of got stuck on cowboys and cowgirls and Native American dolls after reading so much Louis L'Amour. Your dolls are favorites of mine.

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  5. Your doll "Valley" is simply amazing! What a grand talent you have. I love both of the outfits, her dress and her ranching cowgirl outfit. You had me so intrigued about the early cowgirls being "hung" for ranching that I did a little search and found a story about one of those poor ladies who was lynched named Ellen Liddy Watson also known as Cattle Kate. It's really awful to know that this really did happen in our American lands not long ago.

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    1. Oh, yes, Cattle Kate is the one being referred to here. It's an interesting story, but a sad one too. I am loving the old Santas you have been doing. Hoping to get my annual Father Christmas finished by Christmas eve.

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  6. Another beautiful creation. Valley is stunning in her clothing. Love those socks! Great story too.

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    1. Sherri, of course you know your way around these hills of the Ozarks! I think a post on dolls once in a while might be a good thing. I just saw your post on the doll quilt. I am going to surprise you one of these days and make one following your instructions.

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  7. Love the doll, her clothing and the story to go along with her.

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