About Blog Title...

As a child, it was one of my greatest delights to visit my grandparents in the spring when the whip-poor-wills began to call. Grandma and Grandpa lived in a remote valley of the Ozark Mountains where there were trees a plenty, and, seemingly, a whip-poor-will, or two, in each one.
My grandmother insisted that a whip-poor-will's call was not "whip-poor-will," but instead, "chip-butter-white-oak." I would listen really hard trying to hear it exactly as she said it was, but all I could hear was "whip-poor-will, whip-poor-will,..." But, I never let on to her.
I remember my grandpa watching and listening, with an amused look on his face, to one of these listening sessions. Shortly after that he began to call me, just for fun, "Chip Butter." It is a name I am proud to wear for I still love to hear that long, lonesome call on a warm summer's eve. And, sometimes, when I listen really, really hard, it seems I can hear quite clearly, "chip-butter-white-oak, chip-butter-white-oak..."


Sunday, February 24, 2013

Monday, February 18, 2013

Twiggy...







She is not the first Twiggy. There was her grandmother, a holstein-jersey cross, who was the first, and then her mother who was the second.  The present Twiggy is a beautiful cow, everything one could possibly want in a beef cow.  She is three-fourths Angus, one-eighth holstein, and one-eighth jersey.  She will have a calf soon, and it will be...the fractions and percentages in its pedigree are getting harder to figure...I will think about this later.  But, for now, we just hope she will have a heifer calf, one to keep on in the herd, one to be named Twiggy... the fourth Twiggy!


Sunday, February 17, 2013

That Long, Lonesome Howl...






Along about dusk many evenings, we often hear the long, lonesome call of the coyote.  We have become so accustomed to it that we hardly think anything of it.  However, the coyote in the picture doesn't actually howl for he is only a bit of yard art that I happen to like; another way to bring a bit of the American West into our front yard. 


Saturday, February 16, 2013

Early Blossoms...






Some of the true elms and red and silver maples are among our earliest blooming large trees.  The flowers and buds in the early stages of development are rusty red, often tinged with purple.  Elm seeds are eaten by songbirds such as purple finch and goldfinch, also grouse, quail, turkey and wood duck.  Squirrels feed on elm buds and seeds in early spring.   (TREES, SHRUBS, & VINES of ARKANSAS by Carl G. Hunter)


Wednesday, February 13, 2013

Watching Over Us...







From this view point, this rock formation makes me think of some giant creature, not so unlike  Egypt's Guardian Sphinx.  I like to think this creature, whatever it is, is watching over us.


Tuesday, February 5, 2013

It's That Time...






Mother Nature seems to be right on track with last year's schedule... one year ago today, I posted a picture of the first jonquils in bloom.



Sunday, February 3, 2013

Why should...






...I explore the world when there is so much to explore between the road and my own doorstep?            ~Henry David Thoreau