About Blog Title...

As a child, it was one of my greatest delights to visit my grandparents in the spring when the whip-poor-wills began to call. Grandma and Grandpa lived in a remote valley of the Ozark Mountains where there were trees a plenty, and, seemingly, a whip-poor-will, or two, in each one.
My grandmother insisted that a whip-poor-will's call was not "whip-poor-will," but instead, "chip-butter-white-oak." I would listen really hard trying to hear it exactly as she said it was, but all I could hear was "whip-poor-will, whip-poor-will,..." But, I never let on to her.
I remember my grandpa watching and listening, with an amused look on his face, to one of these listening sessions. Shortly after that he began to call me, just for fun, "Chip Butter." It is a name I am proud to wear for I still love to hear that long, lonesome call on a warm summer's eve. And, sometimes, when I listen really, really hard, it seems I can hear quite clearly, "chip-butter-white-oak, chip-butter-white-oak..."


Monday, May 5, 2014

Umbrella Magnolia...



Last August when I first made an acquaintance with the Umbrella Magnolia here, I knew, if at all possible, I would be back in the spring to see the large white flowers of these small trees. Right then and there, I mentally planned a trip back to this lovely place.   I knew the visit would have to be made when the water in the streams was not too high, for there is no way to reach this special spot without crossing a stream of water.  I could only guess when the flowers might appear, April-June, I had read. 

So, this weekend, when the weather was just picture perfect for a ride on the ATV into the backwoods, we set out to see what we could see.  And, here is what we found... 







Still no bear to show!  Maybe next time... 




16 comments:

  1. Very beautiful flowers and it seems you picked the perfect time.

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    1. Bethann, we just happened to be here at the right time. It is nice to be lucky once in a while.

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  2. Very pretty. You know that Mississippi is the magnolia state. they lined the interstate with magnolia trees. I don't have one, but we do have gardenia bushes, that resemble and smell a lot like the magnolia. they are beautiful. My mother painted a magnolia. Your special spot is beautiful and I enjoyed the pictures.

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    1. Martha, even though there are several magnolia trees in our little town, I had no experience with them at all. I was so surprised to learn that this particular one grows in the wild this far north. The flower is just so beautiful, even though the smell isn't! Lucky you to live in the Magnolia State!
      I am enjoying my Martha doll so much. We all love her!!! I have been taking some pictures of her so I can do a post about her. She deserves only the best when I show her off here. I still haven't pulled her shoes off!

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  3. Beautiful place in the backwoods. The flowers are beautiful too.

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    1. We did enjoy our time here, kicking back and enjoying a little quiet time beside the creek. The next day I wanted to go back. Thank you for visiting!

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  4. Such a beautiful gem hidden away to be shared by Nature and those that chance upon it. And is it fragrant like the other hybrids we find scattered across the country or is there only a delicate scent luring and tempting the bees that pass by?
    Hope you are well and enjoying the season.
    Susan x

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    1. Susan, I think they are ill-smelling, but surely not every critter thinks so. Hope you are enjoying a bit of spring too!

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  5. This looks like a delicate little flower; is it very large? I don't think I've ever seen one.

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    1. Charlotte, the flowers were a bit larger than a saucer. The leaves will get much bigger, up to two feet long according to Carl Hunter. The leaves I brought home last year were about a foot and a half long. I wanted to bring one of the flowers home this year, but we forgot our Deet and I didn't want to risk getting ticks.

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  6. Replies
    1. Ernestine, Wikipedia says there are about 210 flowering plant species in the Magnolia family. Before I found this one, I just thought there was one, the Southern Magnolia.

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  7. Replies
    1. Sherri, is there a Magnolia native to your Ozarks? The banks of Swann Creek look like a perfect place for them.

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  8. How lovely! I don't think this would survive in my area. Just beautiful!

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  9. You have captured the flower very beautifully!

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