About Blog Title...

As a child, it was one of my greatest delights to visit my grandparents in the spring when the whip-poor-wills began to call. Grandma and Grandpa lived in a remote valley of the Ozark Mountains where there were trees a plenty, and, seemingly, a whip-poor-will, or two, in each one.
My grandmother insisted that a whip-poor-will's call was not "whip-poor-will," but instead, "chip-butter-white-oak." I would listen really hard trying to hear it exactly as she said it was, but all I could hear was "whip-poor-will, whip-poor-will,..." But, I never let on to her.
I remember my grandpa watching and listening, with an amused look on his face, to one of these listening sessions. Shortly after that he began to call me, just for fun, "Chip Butter." It is a name I am proud to wear for I still love to hear that long, lonesome call on a warm summer's eve. And, sometimes, when I listen really, really hard, it seems I can hear quite clearly, "chip-butter-white-oak, chip-butter-white-oak..."


Saturday, October 11, 2014

Ribbons and Bows...


When my mother told my dad that he had taught me to tie "wrong," I am quite sure I was as unconcerned as any three or four year old would have been.  After all, my dad was an old navy guy and we all know those guys are trained in the art of tying and know all about knots (both as a unit of speed at sea and as a way of securing things).  Dad's way was so easy...left lace over right, pulled back under, loop over thumb, other string over the top, and second loop pushed back through.  And, from that day forth, to this very day, I have proudly tied my own shoes, Dad's way, hundreds, even thousands of times, for I have almost always worn shoes with laces. Mother's admonishment seemed to be unfounded until...


 

I began to tie bows other than on my shoes.  There were sashes to be tied into bows on our little girl's dresses, Christmas bows on festive boxes and wreaths, and beautiful ribbons and bows to tie up the hair.  The bows I tied were not pretty.  The ends of the ribbon wouldn't hang down like they should, and at least one of the ends would end up over the top of one of the loops.  If "Daddy" was home, I told our little daughter to have him tie her sashes, and I often called on him for help with those special bows I wanted to make.  I watched his every twist and turn, and tried to tie exactly as he had done, but old habits, those that have been repeated thousands of times, are hard to break. 








She ties her hair up in ribbons and bows...





 


5 comments:

  1. Cute!! Maybe we just need Velcro to fasten things and pins for the hair. :) I think Mama taught me to tie bows on little dresses, and the farmer taught me to tie a square knot, except now and then I get it backwards. :(

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    1. You had a great teacher! Your mother worked wonders with needle, thread and cloth. Well, I guess Dad was a good teacher too, because my shoes always stayed tied!

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  2. That's sweet. My dad was a navy man too, but he didn't teach me to ties my shoes. At the dance studio my daughter attended for many years, I was always designated as the mother to "tie the bows" for recital!

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    1. Why does this not surprise me :-) I have always admired your beautiful bows.

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  3. I've always felt "wrong" was too subjective a word, anyway. ;~)

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