About Blog Title...

As a child, it was one of my greatest delights to visit my grandparents in the spring when the whip-poor-wills began to call. Grandma and Grandpa lived in a remote valley of the Ozark Mountains where there were trees a plenty, and, seemingly, a whip-poor-will, or two, in each one.
My grandmother insisted that a whip-poor-will's call was not "whip-poor-will," but instead, "chip-butter-white-oak." I would listen really hard trying to hear it exactly as she said it was, but all I could hear was "whip-poor-will, whip-poor-will,..." But, I never let on to her.
I remember my grandpa watching and listening, with an amused look on his face, to one of these listening sessions. Shortly after that he began to call me, just for fun, "Chip Butter." It is a name I am proud to wear for I still love to hear that long, lonesome call on a warm summer's eve. And, sometimes, when I listen really, really hard, it seems I can hear quite clearly, "chip-butter-white-oak, chip-butter-white-oak..."


Wednesday, December 3, 2014

The Tribes...


Thirteen tribes.  I had planned on fourteen, but things got crowded near the top, so "Blackfoot" had to be left off.  The single ply of red floss seemed to behave better than the black, or maybe I just began to get a better feel for the tedious work.  I suppose I should give this map a title..."The Tribes," I think.

 
 




And, what's going on with the robins?  Saturday afternoon, and again on Sunday, but to a lesser degree, a steady stream of robins flew in a southwesterly direction over our house.  There had to be thousands of them, for in the shot below there are about fifty (I tried to count) and that was just what I captured in one click of my camera.  This steady stream went on and on for well over two hours.  I couldn't help wonder where they were going, and what they would eat when they got there?  Surely would take a lot of earth worms!

 

And still they came...  They were close enough that I could see their red breasts.

 


We all watched the flight of the robins above, even Nell, I think, who was quite content to lie at my feet and chew on her new bone.  Early in the summer, there had been a dead deer not far off The Chip Butter Trail. The smell was not pleasant to me, but to Nell it was an invitation to come find a bone to carry home, which she often did, sometimes with my help. (I wrapped the bones in leaves when I carried them.)

Since the hot days of summer, I have been leaving Nell home to guard the place.  And... well... it's hard to think about, but she's past fourteen now and the climb up the trail is hard on an elderly lady, such as she now is.  When I saw this bone on the path, I thought of her, picked it up, and carried it home to my sweet Nell.  I could tell she was delighted. 





16 comments:

  1. "THE TRIBES" ARE VERY , VERY BEAUTIFUL !!!
    CONGRATULATIONS...
    ELIANE
    http://elianeapkroker.blogspot.com.br/

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    1. Thanks Eliane. It has been a learning experience, for sure!

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  2. I love the glimpses into your world. the embroidery is poignant.....lovely.

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    1. Thanks Susie. As we prepare for winter, you prepare for summer.

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  3. Love your tribes map; great job. My heart goes out to your dog; just love her. How nice for you to bring her a bone. The birds in flight; interesting. There are so many! Thanks for sharing.

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    1. Thanks Sandra. As Tom T. Hall sings, "Ain't but three things in this world that's worth a solitary dime, But old dogs and children and watermelon wine...Old dogs care about you even when you make mistakes..." That's my Nell.

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  4. The fabric you dyed for the map makes it look like an antique parchment. Very tedious work & the letters came out beautifully, they are not easy to do. Beautiful job. A couple of weeks ago I heard a loud screaming noise (I can barely hear noises inside the cabin). When I stepped outside it was deafening. Cappy ran back into the house she was so scared. It was crows that had landed in the trees on the property next to us. Although I couldn't see them, there must have been hundreds & hundreds of them. It went on for over half an hour. Now I know why they are called a murder of crows. Pretty robins would have been so much nicer!

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    1. Sherri, I loved the way this old fabric turned out. And, it is only some kind of cheap sacking that my mother had saved.

      I have tried to make friends with the crows that visit my backyard to peck up table scraps that I throw out for them, but have had little luck. I have heard crows never forget a friendly face (or an unfriendly one) so you would think they would like me for the handouts. Funny Cappy!

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  5. The map is turning out beautiful and interesting too. It does look old too. I imagine the robins was a sight to see. We see the ducks go over in large groups, but never small birds. They evidently know what they are doing though. Your dog is a beauty and I know how much you love her, I hope she continues to do well and enjoy everything.

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    1. Martha, hopefully the robins did know what they were doing, or... When our grandson was small, he always referred to Nell as Beautiful Nell, so she should be quite conceited. She is doing very well now.

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  6. Your map is so interesting. I want to follow the rivers to learn more about the tribes. Great job! I was returning home from work one evening as the sun was setting and a HUGE flock of geese were circling to land. From a distance, I thought it was a tornado because of the vortex shape and continuous movement. It was so awesome, that I wanted to pull over and watch it, but the traffic was busy and I felt I'd better move on. It's something that I'll always remember. Nature is wonderful.

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    1. Oh my gosh, Cindy...interesting comment. As I stitched this piece, I stopped so many times to do just that....google for information on the rivers and the tribes. Nature is wonderful. Lucky you to be in the right place at the right time to see the landing of the geese in the setting sun.

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  7. You've done wonderful work on the map; does this go into the little book?
    I have seen flocks of robins, such as these, go over too, and I wonder how far they will go.
    The dogs here bring up deer bones, armadillo shells, sticks, you name it and it's in the yard.

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    1. Yes, Charlotte, the map will be the centerfold. I plan to sew the pages together by your directions. Our dogs keep us well supplied in yard art, too! Nell loves armadillo shells, too. I may have to find one for her for Christmas...

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  8. What a treasure is your embroidered map. It seems a waste to put in a book--how beautiful it would be, framed! But it would surely enhance the book. :~D When we lived in Florida we enjoyed when the robins began to migrate back to the north. I'm pretty sure they were coming up from somewhere south of us, but I don't know where. They would land in our favorite hiking forest by the gajillion, making so much noise!

    Enjoy your sweet Nell, and know that she is having the very best life a dog can have. Hugs to you, Mary.

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  9. Love reading your sharing
    and talented you are.
    This one gardens, writes and cooks :)
    Take care
    and sweet Nell has a good life.

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