About Blog Title...

As a child, it was one of my greatest delights to visit my grandparents in the spring when the whip-poor-wills began to call. Grandma and Grandpa lived in a remote valley of the Ozark Mountains where there were trees a plenty, and, seemingly, a whip-poor-will, or two, in each one.
My grandmother insisted that a whip-poor-will's call was not "whip-poor-will," but instead, "chip-butter-white-oak." I would listen really hard trying to hear it exactly as she said it was, but all I could hear was "whip-poor-will, whip-poor-will,..." But, I never let on to her.
I remember my grandpa watching and listening, with an amused look on his face, to one of these listening sessions. Shortly after that he began to call me, just for fun, "Chip Butter." It is a name I am proud to wear for I still love to hear that long, lonesome call on a warm summer's eve. And, sometimes, when I listen really, really hard, it seems I can hear quite clearly, "chip-butter-white-oak, chip-butter-white-oak..."


Thursday, July 2, 2015

"The love of gardening...

...is a seed once sown that never dies."
                                                 ~Gertrude Jekyll
                                     




Some plants just kind of grow wherever they please.  I think I like them best.  Now, I would argue that these lovely stalks of woolly mullein (there are more) certainly do add a pleasing element to an otherwise rather ordinary country lane.

Henry David Thoreau once wrote, "Gardening is civil and social, but it wants the vigor and freedom of the forest and the outlaws."  So, as I see it, the woolly mullein is a bit of an outlaw, wanting "vigor and freedom of the forest."  In that is part of its beauty, I think.








A gardener is a caretaker for sure. Many hours of these long days of summer are spent caring for the farm and gardens.  But, it is something I enjoy doing, and often find myself thinking of my grandmothers who helped to work the land too.

I love the image of a woman who would strap a young child onto the back of a horse or a mule and then take up the lines made of leather, or the wooden handles of a plow, to work the fields.

And, no, I don't think it was a bad thing for the child either, for "A garden is a grand teacher.  It teaches patience and careful watchfulness; it teaches industry and thrift; above all it teaches entire trust."  (Gertrude Jekyll)





















12 comments:

  1. I think everyone should get their hands in the dirt. It is the connection to the past and to the present.
    Lovely post!

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  2. There is something kind of thought provoking to see nature running a bit rampant and wild with no disregard for what we humans want to control! I think all gardens should have an area where they can be their nature "wild child" self. And what a great lesson gardening can be, not just for children, but adults alike, to accomplish something so basic as to provide food. I'm always encouraging city folks to have a small bed of veggies. They often are amazed at how easy it really is and how rewarding. When winter hits, I will gaze in wonder at my many jars of canned vegetables, knowing I work hard and will always have something good to eat.

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  3. Very lovely post. I always agree with the quotes of Gertrude J. and would add that gardeners have great faith and always the belief that "next year, it will be even better!"

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  4. Your little garden is so pretty! I love all the vintage pieces too! They add so much interest to things.

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  5. Every thing is so pretty. You must work out there everyday for everything to be so green, flowers in full bloom . I like working in the yard too, but your garden and yards are just perfection

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  6. I love your philosophy and quotes about gardening and so agree! Lovely photos. Your garden area is so beautiful!

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  7. I love your philosophy and quotes about gardening and so agree! Lovely photos. Your garden area is so beautiful!

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  8. I love your country lane photo! I love the quotes and your outlook on gardening! All of your photos are so lovely!

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  9. I love your country lane photo! I love the quotes and your outlook on gardening! All of your photos are so lovely!

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  10. A lovely blog you have here, Chip Butter. I don't know that I've ever heard a whip-poor-will sing, but I do know that I love your name. Happy gardening/farming and happy new moon tonight.

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  11. Hello Miss "Chip" :-)
    I thoroughly enjoyed my visit in your wonderful garden today!!!!
    Many Blessings and warmth, Linnie

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