About Blog Title...

As a child, it was one of my greatest delights to visit my grandparents in the spring when the whip-poor-wills began to call. Grandma and Grandpa lived in a remote valley of the Ozark Mountains where there were trees a plenty, and, seemingly, a whip-poor-will, or two, in each one.
My grandmother insisted that a whip-poor-will's call was not "whip-poor-will," but instead, "chip-butter-white-oak." I would listen really hard trying to hear it exactly as she said it was, but all I could hear was "whip-poor-will, whip-poor-will,..." But, I never let on to her.
I remember my grandpa watching and listening, with an amused look on his face, to one of these listening sessions. Shortly after that he began to call me, just for fun, "Chip Butter." It is a name I am proud to wear for I still love to hear that long, lonesome call on a warm summer's eve. And, sometimes, when I listen really, really hard, it seems I can hear quite clearly, "chip-butter-white-oak, chip-butter-white-oak..."


Wednesday, August 5, 2015

The First Week Of August...




The first week of August hangs at the very top of summer, the top of the live-long year, like the highest seat of a Ferris Wheel when it pauses in its turning.  The weeks that come before are only a climb from balmy spring, and those that follow a drop to the chill of autumn, but the first week of August is motionless, and hot.  It is curiously silent, too, with blank white dawns and glaring noons, and sunsets smeared with too much color.
                                                                        ~ Natalie Babbitt, Tuck Everlasting



With the hot August sun glaring down almost every day, and with an abundance of colorful blossoms in every field and garden, it's a good time to take advantage of a bit of solar heating to experiment with eco-print bundling.*  On these small samples of muslin, I was delighted to have actually captured a bit of color from blue saliva from the garden. It just might be, if these bundles had been left undisturbed for a much longer time allowing the heat of a succession of blistering hot summer days to work its magic, the blue might have been darker...perhaps as deep as indigo! (Dream on, dream on...)

*The Bundle Book ~India Flint 




And, just in case it turns out that there is an eco-dyed cloth suitable for a new dress, someone will need to model it.  The little cloth gal, who is made from muslin aged in a black walnut wash, is hoping for the job.  And,  I am hoping I can remember the dos and don'ts in sculpting a doll.  I am looking closely at the last one I did...remembering as I go.  

















Meanwhile, the seventeen weaning heifers have made the transition from Mom-ma's babies to Big Girls without much ado, except for getting out of their new pasture once, and helping themselves to some choice nibbles around the yard.  Having been together since their birth, they are a close knit bunch and can always be found together, whether grazing, drinking from the stream, or bedded down to rest. I am thinking they might go through hell or high water to stay together...even on our front door step!  






And, as in any season, the perfect ending to any day...Nell at my feet.






















14 comments:

  1. Wonderful photos and I am in love with your antiqued doll body, she would make a wonderful rag doll as well as a sculpted doll I think. Our weather has been unsettled the last few days with spotty thunderstorms but will be cooler and less humid for the next week. Autumn will be upon us before too long.

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    1. Thanks, Judi! I know you are happy about the cooler weather ahead. We had a bit of rain blow in around noon today, which cooled us off, but we are expecting more hot stuff for the weekend and next week. Ah, to be in Vermont in the fall...you lucky girl!

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  2. I really, really liked the quote! How interesting to see how the sun can turn the blossoms into color!
    Our heifers stay in a close-knit group too. I'm anxious to see the finished doll!

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    1. Not all blossoms will leave behind color. I also bundled up some red blossoms and got nothing. You need to read "The Bundle Book." Since you are into chemistry and biology, it might be right up your alley. I will loan it to you for a day. It is short!

      I am in love with these heifers! They just seem extra special...not exactly sure how and why!

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  3. The gardens looks quite different from August. I hope the corn was sweet. That is so interesting the way you color your fabric. It goes so well with your style. Your doll looks so detailed. I am sure this one will turn out as well as all your others. So exciting for us to wait and see the new finish. The farm keeps you busy with bailing hay and caring for the cows! I like your companion at your feet; a perfect ending for a busy day.

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    1. Thanks Sandra! The corn was sweet, and the freezer is almost full. About all I have left are a few tomatoes and okra. If I can work a little each day on the doll, it shouldn't take too long to finish her up. I watch your weather in N.D. and it seems you have had a fairly good summer.

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  4. It will soon be changing in the way the weather feels. It is still hot, but something is different, I love fall, it is my favorite time of year. the blue color is wonderful, maybe you can find a way to make more of it to color your fabric. The antique looking body is very nice. You will make a super doll with her. She is so pretty, just putting a simple face on her would be great too. The cows are sweet.

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    1. Yes, Martha, I am noticing a change too, especially in the evenings. I am looking forward to fall, for sure! I am trying a larger piece with the blue, but am not going to hurry this one. I know you could put a pretty face on that little doll that would do her proud! I love your visits here!

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  5. And here on the other side of the world in the other hemisphere, we wait for signs of spring. This winter has been a hard, cold one with lots of frosts and for the first time ever here where I live (40 years!) snow briefly settled on the ground. I love the quote you used at the top of your post - when I first read it, I thought they were your own words and I thought: "This girl can WRITE!" Only faintly disappointed that it was a quote......and all your words, anyway, are worthy of a read! :)

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    1. Spring on the way for you; fall for us...a good thing for you and for me, I think. By this time, I have grown a bit weary of the hot, hot days, and began to look for any signs of change in the season. How delightful that you had snow! Too bad it didn't stay awhile.

      About writing, I think all of us should do more, don't you? It just might help keep the old cogs in the brain moving a bit...worth a try, for sure!

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  6. The August sun does indeed glare down and the cool evenings are upon us in Ohio. The photos of the Heifers are beautiful. I'm sure they enjoyed each little nibble before being herded back to their pasture.
    The dyed muslin with it's blue is beautiful and will make a wonderful dress for your doll. Your doll body is very well made. I'm sure you'll remember how to sculpt those lovely faces. I look forward to seeing her come to life.

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    1. Thanks Bethann. It's a bit risky showing works in progress for one can never be sure how things will turn out. There's, for sure, a big question mark that the blue cloth will make it to the finish line...

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  7. What an interesting way to color fabric. I have used organic material to dye basket reed and some fabric and I really like how it turns out. It's not as dark as ritz dye, for example, but I like the soft earthy tones. Your blue is gorgeous! And what a lovely garment it will make. And about the heifers...what a clan! I bet they would follow each other into all kind of mischief. You have your hands full...

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    1. Cindy, I am sure you, like me, like to use black walnut for dyeing basket reed. It never fails to please me even with cloth. We have had our eyes on those heifers from the day they hit the ground. Who knows what they may get into next! These hot days they head to the deepest shade they can find along the creek...not a bad idea, I think!

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