About Blog Title...

As a child, it was one of my greatest delights to visit my grandparents in the spring when the whip-poor-wills began to call. Grandma and Grandpa lived in a remote valley of the Ozark Mountains where there were trees a plenty, and, seemingly, a whip-poor-will, or two, in each one.
My grandmother insisted that a whip-poor-will's call was not "whip-poor-will," but instead, "chip-butter-white-oak." I would listen really hard trying to hear it exactly as she said it was, but all I could hear was "whip-poor-will, whip-poor-will,..." But, I never let on to her.
I remember my grandpa watching and listening, with an amused look on his face, to one of these listening sessions. Shortly after that he began to call me, just for fun, "Chip Butter." It is a name I am proud to wear for I still love to hear that long, lonesome call on a warm summer's eve. And, sometimes, when I listen really, really hard, it seems I can hear quite clearly, "chip-butter-white-oak, chip-butter-white-oak..."


Friday, October 30, 2015

A Nice Finish....



The Seventeen...

The Cowboy kept me way too busy this week with cattle doings and such, so there wasn't a lot of time for play.  We dodged showers here and there, but that was a good thing, for we so needed the rain.

    The last of the cloths are out of the dye pot, so that's it for the leaves this year.  I got some nice results, but this year's attempts fall a bit short of those from the year that I first bundled cloth and leaves and tossed them into a pot.  Both then and this year, the leaves were pulled from the water at stream's edge. Now I wonder if those first leaves might have been a bit more decomposed, for I remember that they were quite soggy and slimy. I will think about that next fall when I try again.  But, for now I am turning to the garden, which still has lots of luscious color that I would love to capture on cloth.

     One rainy afternoon, I modified the little doll-girl, giving her a slightly larger torso and a second skin.  It had seemed to me that her head was a bit large, so I had been pondering how I could fix the problem.  I simply slipped a slightly larger torso over the first one, stuffed around it and stitched it down just below the shoulder plate.  And finally, I pulled the second-skin up and over it all, stitching and gluing around the edges.  It is a nice finish.  Now for that nice brown dress...


Four nice cloths...

So many stitching possibilities...


From a previous year...

Luscious colors still...

 Even a tiny butterfly...

Not giving up yet...

Sassafras ~ a Chipbutter award winner for best of color...

Second skin...


14 comments:

  1. The dyeing has such wonderful colors, I look forward to seeing what you put on these beautiful pages. The dolly's new skin looks just the right size, funny how certain details nag us until we finally make a change! I love the colors of the sassafras too. My mother and I used to did the roots and brew hot tea, so good. After a couple of frosts and before it freezes is the best time according to the old timers. I'll have to put that on my list!

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  2. When you finish brewing a nice pot of hot sassafras tea, give me a call! Billy Joe Tatum's, Wild Foods Cookbook & Field Guide gives specific information on both digging the root and brewing the tea. Now, Dolly's new skin went through some guess-test-and-revise sessions before I got it (almost) right. I left the bottom of the legs large enough to fit over her sculpted shoes, so there are a few gathers at her knees. I have cut the legs a bit smaller for the next doll, so I will leave the seam open a bit at the bottom and hand stitch it closed after it is on the doll.

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  3. The dyed cloth is pretty. I can imagine lots of uses for it. Sometimes you have to re do a doll part and resizing the body is usually sort of hard. but your doll's body looks good and the second skin is nice. Her body seems just right for her. Recently we have been renovating our house, and I have had antique or primitive paintings all over, but my feelings have turned toward a more modern look, especially in the paintings. I have become interested in modern abstract pictures. Your dyed cloth would definitely make a beautiful stretched picture. As a special gift to myself, I bought a couple of very big beautiful abstract paintings, partly because I won't have time to do it myself, and if I did I don't have to training to do the work. I used to think any body can do an abstract, but it is really harder than it seems. the dyed cloths are very pretty and I can definitely see some hanging on the wall. The natural patterns will stop you to look at them. The cows are pretty too. Beautiful place you have.

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    1. Martha, it does seem our tastes are constantly changing. Perhaps, we just get tired of one thing, so turn to another. I am not surprised that you like abstract paintings. I know you would do a great job with one, if time would allow. Abstracts really could be used well with your primitive works, which I hope you don't put away.

      The leaf prints are one-of-a-kind pieces for sure...art, I guess. When I stitch on them, I sometimes think it is a shame to cover the wonderful designs printed there. Thanks for the suggestion of framing one...wish I hadn't washed the pieces so they would have that right out of the pot look. But, I can do another.



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  4. The designs that appear on your dyed cloths are just marvelous, what a joy to work with such fabrics. The solution to adding bulk to your little lady was perfect, I trust she is now just the right size. That would also be a great way to repair an antique doll with a semi cloth body; I may do it with one of my poor old gals who is falling to bits.

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    1. Yes, I think the addition of a second skin might work well for repairing an old doll. It is good to leave the old ones "as is" for as long as possible, but there comes a time when repairs need to be made. I love cloth, even these old scraps of sacking from long ago.

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  5. Those fabrics! Makes me itch to create. I can't wait to see how you use them all.

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    1. I plan to cover them over with stitches of all kinds. I will just follow my instincts, so who knows? I love needle, cloth and thread, and I know you do too!

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  6. Interesting dyeing with the leaves. I can remember trying "rust" dyeing in some of my dye classes but haven't tried it since. You fabrics make me want to try it again. Still lots of color for you but ours is all gone in the gardens. Now it is time to clean all the leaves. They are pretty when they turn but mean a lot of work when they fall.

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    1. I have seen some rust dyeing that was just wonderful, but I haven't tried it yet. There are plenty of leaves falling...enough,to cover all the cloth in the Ozarks, it seems. My trail is carpeted with leaves...so nice!

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  7. I love the brown hues of your cloth. Can't wait to see all the kinds of stitches you make on it.
    Do you save seeds from those lovely flowers?

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    1. Tonight I am doing chain and buttonhole stitches...FUN! I could save seeds for you, but take note that there's a lot of pink in the zinnias; wanted more red. Andrea's Garden has lots of beautiful flowers, too!

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  8. Your cloths are so interesting! I'm like Martha, in that I would love to sit and look at them and ponder. But...I know they also will make a wonderful outfit for your lovey doll. I really like sassafras tea! We don't have those trees here and I didn't know they made such a lovely color as seasons change. Fun to watch and enjoy.

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  9. Yes, yes, that would be my guess as well .... your leaves had already given up their goodness (and their tannins perhaps) to the season. Heartier results would probably come from an earlier gleaning.
    So fun to stop by here after so long a time - especially to discover that natural dye work is going on ;>))

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