About Blog Title...

As a child, it was one of my greatest delights to visit my grandparents in the spring when the whip-poor-wills began to call. Grandma and Grandpa lived in a remote valley of the Ozark Mountains where there were trees a plenty, and, seemingly, a whip-poor-will, or two, in each one.
My grandmother insisted that a whip-poor-will's call was not "whip-poor-will," but instead, "chip-butter-white-oak." I would listen really hard trying to hear it exactly as she said it was, but all I could hear was "whip-poor-will, whip-poor-will,..." But, I never let on to her.
I remember my grandpa watching and listening, with an amused look on his face, to one of these listening sessions. Shortly after that he began to call me, just for fun, "Chip Butter." It is a name I am proud to wear for I still love to hear that long, lonesome call on a warm summer's eve. And, sometimes, when I listen really, really hard, it seems I can hear quite clearly, "chip-butter-white-oak, chip-butter-white-oak..."


Monday, September 11, 2017

Don't forget your "jumper"...







"Don't forget your jumper," my dad would often remind me when I was a kid and going out on a chilly day. I never thought much about his use of the word "jumper" when I was young, but later began to wonder about it.  I might just think it was because  he was a sailor, for one of the meanings given in the Oxford dictionary is "a loose outer jacket worn by sailors,"  but I seem to remember his dad, my grandfather, calling his Big Smith denim jacket a "jumper."  Well, no matter, I like the word, so "a jumper it'll be when I head over the trail on  cool, crisp mornings such as this morning.  My corduroy "jumper" did feel good!









And, how about wearing a jumper like the one pictured above?  Talk about "stylin'!  This is one of my favorites from Boro, Rags and Tatters from the Far North of Japan.  (Yukiko Koide & Kyoichi Tsuzuki).

"Situated dead-end on the northernmost tip of the main island of Honshu, Aomori was home to dirt poor farmers who, out of desperate necessity, created an astonishing textile aesthetic out of boro - mere rags. Everything from work clothes to babies diapers to futon bedding for the long winter nights was sewn from stiff, scratchy hemp cloth.  And, if a single layer wasn't warm enough, they stitched and reinforced layer on layer, patching holes and stuffing hemp fuzz in between for whatever little insulation they could get.  Boro was the shape of survival in this inhospitable land."







Bag made of hemp...


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My latest stitching creations, which I like to call "Rice Bag Therapy," have become a big hit here in our neck of the woods.  These bags of rice are made from soft cotton knit that I salvaged from a pair of old Land's End Pants.  The bag shown here has eight sections which keeps the rice evenly distributed so it can be more easily applied to a knee, neck, or back.  Now, when those old aggravating aches and pains show up at the end of a long day's work, we just pop our bags into the microwave for about a minute, and soon enjoy warm, soothing relief!  (Warning:  I did break a couple of machine needles.  I suppose hand stitching the seams is also an option.)








25 comments:

  1. Wow such a great idea. It might be nice to add some nice aromatherapy oil for a beautiful fragrance.

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    1. The oil is a great idea. As it is, the bag does have a bit of a smell of rice.

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  2. I didn't come across the term "jumper," as soon as you did. :-)

    Net-heard it from British people. And in reading. And it was a learning curve for me, to understand it.

    To me, a "jumper" is a sleeveless dress. I prefer them longer. And I can wear a turtle neck and a shirt, under them, in winter.

    Language! Names! Sayings! So intriguing! :-)

    Like the sound of that 'warmth' bag. Sounds lovely, doesn't it?

    Luna Crone

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    1. It is possible Dad's "jumper" came along from our British ancestors. I know your "jumper" well. My mother dressed me in lots of little jumpers when I was a kid. I may have to make one just to wear around home with a turtle neck and leggings in winter. Thanks, Luna!

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  3. I've never heard it called a jacket, but I have a British friend who uses the word for what we could call a sweater. :) The rice thing--my dog has one. It's true. His doesn't have divisions sewn in, and I might just to that now, but he likes it in a pillow case on which he lays with the rice back at the edge of the bed...sort of creates a "bumper" so he doesn't roll off the end. Not sure how we arrived at that, but he sleeps better (and doesn't come crowding us at the top of the bed while we're sleeping) because he feels more secure. Strange but true.

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    1. Jan, I can understand your dog's liking for a "bumper," for I like one too...against my back. Without it I don't sleep so well.

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  4. I meant never heard it called Jumper. Oops.

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  5. I have made these and help the aches and pains so much. HMMMMMMMMM, maybe I should make one for Max. He might like to have one also. Hugs, LJ

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    1. I made a couple of these for our son when he was having problems with a knee...cured him right up. He still sleeps with it around that knee just as a prevention for future attacks.

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  6. How interesting a book to read and learn from. I love the idea of people using what they have and repurposing items. Those clothes are quite imaginative. The Rice Bag Therapy you made is a great idea. With your farm and garden I imagine you are quite busy and may at times have some sore muscles...and this should help.

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    1. Sandra, the thing that makes these pieces so beautiful are that they were made from necessity. Nothing was wasted, and even the smallest fragments of cloth were used in these garments. I loved the book!

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  7. I like your rice bag with the 8 sections! I made one and it had three sections, and the rice tends to fall to just one side. I like your design better! I may have to make another one! Thank you for visiting me, and I apologize for taking so long to get over to visit you! How happy I am to be here, I enjoyed hearing about your stories growing up, and how your Dad called a jacket a jumper. I hope you are doing well, and I look forward to getting to know you better :)

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    1. Marilyn, Mountain Top Spice is one of my favorite places to visit. I am looking forward to the next garden tea party, for sure!

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  8. I've never heard a jacket called a jumper before. That's neat. I like wearing jumpers (dresses). That about the clothing made from hemp is amazing. Can you imagine kids now days having to wear clothing like that to keep warm. I like that bag made of hemp. There is something pretty there. I could use a rice bag...I have a shoulder that aches terribly bad at night. Maybe I'll try making one. Thanks! Henny

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    1. I also think the hemp bag is beautiful. The jacket was quite heavy though, because of all the stuffing between layers.

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  9. What interesting information about jumpers! The "Boro " book looks like a fascinating read.
    Your rice bag sounds lovely. Perfect thing for an aching back!
    Take care.
    Robin

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    1. Oh, yes for the back. I go to sleep quite often with one on my back.

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  10. It's heartening what words warm the soul from loved ones past.
    Your "Rice Bag Therapy" sounds like a helpful and handy idea. Thanks for sharing. :)

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    1. And, somethings just seem to stick with us more than others. Like that old "jumper."

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  11. We have a bag something like yours. It has supposedly herbs and probably rice in it too. they are great for your aches and pains. Very interesting on the making clothes with what you have to work with, people can be very smart and figure out ways to make what they need. If I was freezing I would try to find stuff around me to help make me a coat too.

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    1. Martha, my mother was skilled at ripping apart old clothing to make something "new." When I was young she gave me the job of picking out the threads from the old seams. I was always happy to wear something new made from something old.

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  12. The jumper is beautifully constructed. I'm reminded of the many times my mother talked about not wasting anything. Every left over pea was added to the container in the freezer to be used in soup. I washed and dried aluminum foil and plastic bags. Older clothing was donated or the buttons were removed from worn clothing and the cloth would find it's way in a quilt. We even used the waxed paper bags in the cereal boxes. I never got the impression my mother was goofy, she just grew up during the depression and valued all things and passed that on to me. I will say, I totally refuse to wash aluminum foil, but then again, they don't make aluminum foil like they used to!

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    1. My parents also grew up during the depression, so the things you wrote are very familiar to me, as well. Now, those little waxed paper bags in cereal boxes are still pretty handy, don't you think? :~)

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  13. I have a Big Smith Jumper of the palest blue. It reminds me of the original owner, George Gompf, my grandfather.

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    1. Ronnie, what a treasure! So, did he refer to it as his "jumper?"

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